Cider Mill: Here It All Begins

The city of Hereford (pronounced Hair’-i-furd not Her’-furd; as our tour guide said, “you Yanks got that bit wrong”) has been in existence since the Romans found it as a convenient place to ford the River Wye in the early 7th century. The city of 50,000 is an eclectic collection of old and new including a thoroughly modern supermarket down the block from a 1000-year-old cathedral. Hereford is the home to the World Hereford Cattle Registry (which we Americans pronounce Her’-furd), and the SAS (Special Air Services – the UKs

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Cider Styles: A Primer

Cider styles are hard to pin down because historically, styles had little value to the cider maker. The cider they made was the only cider they had the resources to make. It’s not so different today. But to understand it you have to go back to cider’s roots. Cider is an ancient drink though no one is quite sure when it was first made because of the geography of its main component, the apple. Apples were historically confined to the cooler climes of Western Europe and Britain where civilization was

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Craft Brewers’ Conference 2002

brewers conference

Breweries in the market for a practical and affordable source of continuing education have no easy shopping trip. Brewing schools focus on the technical aspects of the brewing process, marketing seminars review case studies from other often-unrelated industries and public beer festivals concentrate on product promotion. Only the annual Craft Brewers Conference provides a broad perspective on production and sales strategy for today’s craft beer breweries and brewpubs. Organized and presented by the Association of Brewers (AOB), the three day conference which took place from April 11 through April 13

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Death and Taxes – A Story of Beer

Sharp-witted Benjamin Franklin once observed there were two guarantees in life – death and taxes. Simple,but irrefutable, that statement touches every facet of life. Franklin’s two constants have continuously shaped everything we love, fear, anticipate, dread, and enjoy – including beer. From ancient times to present, beer, like us, has never escaped far from the shadowy twins known as the taxman and the grim reaper. Civilizations of antiquity and history’s earliest records tell the tale again and again of death, taxes and beer. In the beginning, brewers of the Fertile

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The Golden Age Of Taverns

Stepping through customs at Ellis Island presented Louis Menapace with a jumble of emotions. He was excited at the new life that lay before him, confusion over the way his name had just been Americanized, and slightly anxious about how long it would take to fit into this new country. Then, a few feet before he was to board the ferry to New York, a young boy had thrust a flier in his hand, it advertised a beer garden that welcomed immigrants. He thought about it all the way across

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Grand Teton Brewing Company – A New Name For An Old Friend

The name Otto Brothers is well known in the intermountain west especially in the Jackson Hole-Yellowstone area. Now as the Grand Teton Brewery they are becoming the region’s premier name in beer. The story of the Grand Teton Brewery begins about 13 years ago, but the story of its founder begins a few years before. Charlie Otto had lived and traveled extensively in Europe where he developed an appreciation for the styles of beers available there. When he moved back to the States he was disappointed that he didn’t have

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How To Hold A Beer Tasting

Beer tasting

Ever listen to a beer? Each has its own, unique story. Some have a familiarity as comforting as an old pair of slippers, others startle you as they leap from behind a cloak and run along a torturous path of twists, turns and surprises. Unfortunately the average bar, dispensing it in frosted mugs, silences beer. But if you know how to listen, and with a little coaxing, beer will talk to you; here’s how. Begin with the obvious, the selection. If you were judging, the beers would focus on one

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Living the Beer Life – Touring

Only twenty-five years ago few places in America offered a variety of beers. Then, slowly, things changed. With the emergence of microbreweries consumers finally had a choice, but curiously, as the local selection of beer increased, beer enthusiasts began roaming farther and farther afield for beer. It seems odd, but on closer study it makes sense. Their growing interest in great beer ignited a thirst for more. At first, beer travel was simply a search for an adequately supplied homebrew shop, or perhaps a bar that carried more than a

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On Style: A Shout For Stout

Throughout the world, crowded taverns thrill to a “shout for stout.” US beer drinkers might think that odd, but only until they learn the meaning. In a vast number of Anglo-oriented pubs customers recognize “a shout” as slang for a declaration to buy the next round. Not surprising, the grateful response usually results in a flurry of orders for stout. Stout? Indeed. First brewed in the 1700’s, the stout you drink has disputed origins. Some writers describe it as the son of porter. Others insist stout existed long before. Those

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On Style: Altbier

No German style causes more misunderstanding and argument in the United States than Altbier. It seems wherever you go someone has something else to say about the profile of Alt. Opinions like ‘Alt should have big hops’; ‘No, alt’s possess a sweetness’; ‘They have a light bright color’; ‘No way, they’re dark and murky.’ shoot back and forth, in bars, at beerfests, and over the mash tun. How does a beer enthusiast cut through it all? Maybe it requires a trip back to the old country. Associated with the city

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